Hand hygiene is a key to community, home, school wellness

Hand hygiene clearly impacts the wellness of any community. Keeping hands clean at home, in schools and elsewhere makes a significant difference in keeping folks healthy. The impact of poor hand hygiene habits is linked to increased occurrences of illness, absences, and their associated costs. A renewed commitment to “shared responsibility” in our homes and classrooms may be one of our most important infection prevention strategies.

Hand Hygiene at Home and School, written by Patrick Boshell at Infection Control Tips, says “studies demonstrate that poor hand hygiene practices can contribute to an increase in community-based infections including gastrointestinal, skin and respiratory infections. Additionally, there has been a steady increase in the global burden of infectious diseases, resulting in an reported 13 million deaths annually. Between 1980 and 1992, deaths attributed to infectious disease increased by 22%, according to reports.  This is a cause for concern as we continue to see a decline in hand hygiene promotion and education.”

Hand Sanitizer Alert draws attention to the fact that “efficacy experiments reported here reinforce what has been known for more than 50 years: 40% ethanol is a less effective bacterial antiseptic than 60% ethanol. Consumers should be alerted to check the alcohol concentration in hand sanitizers because substandard products may be marketed to the public.”

Effects of Hand Hygiene Campaigns on Incidence of Laboratory-confirmed Influenza and Absenteeism in Schoolchildren, Cairo, Egypt: Elementary schoolchildren are important vectors for spreading infectious diseases between themselves, their families, and their communities, especially in developing countries where public schools are extremely overcrowded. Aiello et al. noted that infectious agents that children contract in schools can result in infections in up to 50% of household members.

Previously, at our blog: