Tag Archives: airborne MRSA

Deadly MRSA enjoys variety of transmission paths

MRSAMRSA is methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, a type of staph bacteria that is resistant to several antibiotics. In the general community, MRSA most often causes skin infections. In some cases, it causes pneumonia (lung infection) and other issues. If left untreated, MRSA infections can become severe and cause sepsis – a life-threatening reaction to severe infection in the body.  MRSA can be transmitted in a variety of ways. Below, we look at some studies and articles that look more closely at MRSA and explore methods of transmission.

Significance of Airborne Transmission of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in an Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery Unit sets out to quantitatively investigate the existence of airborne methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in a hospital environment and to perform phenotyping and genotyping of MRSA isolates to study MRSA epidemiology. It concludes: MRSA was re-circulated among the patients, the air, and the inanimate environments, especially when there was movement in the rooms. Airborne MRSA may play a role in MRSA colonization in the nasal cavity or in respiratory tract MRSA infections. Measures should be taken to prevent the spread of airborne MRSA to control nosocomial MRSA infection in hospitals.

MRSA model of learning and adaptation: a qualitative study among the general public, at BioMed Central, looks at a study that allowed participants to tell their stories in a effort to understand MRSA better. It concludes that the study “underscores the critical importance of educational programs for patients, and improved continuing education for healthcare providers. Five specific results of this study can reduce the vacuum that currently exists between the knowledge and information available to healthcare professionals, and how that information is conveyed to the public. These points include: 1) a common model of MRSA learning and adaptation; 2) the self-directed nature of adult learning; 3) the focus on general MRSA information, care and prevention, and antibiotic resistance; 4) the interconnected nature of adaptation; and, 5) the need for a consistent step by step plan to deal with MRSA provided at the time of diagnosis.”

Superbug colony behaviors revealed in time lapse video indicates that MRSA, thought to have been a static or non-motile organism, has been observed showing signs of active motility by scientists at The Universities of Nottingham and Sheffield. The video is pretty incredible.

Drug-resistant MRSA bacteria: Here to stay in both hospital, community says that MRSA, once confined to hospitals but now widespread in communities, will likely continue to exist in both settings as separate strains, according to a new study. The prediction that both strains will coexist is reassuring because previous projections indicated that the more invasive and fast-growing community strains would overtake and eliminate hospital strains, possibly posing a threat to public health.

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